Find Out More About The Senior Staffy Club:
One Of The Me & My Pets’ Chosen Charities 2017/2018

Senior Staffordshire bull terriers on grass

Staffordshire Bull Terriers sometimes get a bad rep.

But the misconception that these loveable, loyal and incredibly friendly dogs are aggressive is doing more harm than people realise.

Faced with taking home another breed over a staffy seems to be the way to go, and people all too often walk by without even giving them a chance.

Kate Lee is the founder of charity The Senior Staffy Club which she set up to help find loving homes for these loving dogs.

“I would never have any other dog,” says Kate. “I think people believe the bad press – that they’re fighting dogs – but you couldn’t get further from the truth.”

After adopting Buster and Madge – two senior staffies – Kate started to notice a trend of older Staffordshire Bull Terriers who were simply looking for a loving home, but were kept waiting – some for the rest of their lives – simply because of their breed.

“Buster had been waiting in kennels for eight months, and Madge was in a pound about to be put to sleep,” she says.

Kate saw that rescue centres were reluctant to take in older staffies and so she set up a Facebook Page to help re-home staffies that were at risk of being put down. The page’s popularity grew quickly and in 2012, the Senior Staffy Club was born.

“If people just stop and say hello – get to know them – they’ll realise they’re just big softies.

“They will talk to you – they just want to be with you. They want cuddles and they’re very much people dogs and they’ll do anything to please.

“If you want them to fight, they will, but they don’t actually want to – they just want to make you happy. They’re very loving dogs.”

The charity takes in Staffordshire Bull Terriers aged seven and up but only has the capacity to look after around 17 dogs at one time.

Kate and her team of volunteers rely solely on donations and the support of foster carers who can take in the dogs while they are in the process of being re-homed.

“We have a team of 15 dog walkers and nine foster homes as well as 10 on the committee taking care of all of our Staffordshire Bull Terriers.

Staffordshire Bull Terrier out for a walk

“We never say never, we say ‘we’ll do what we can’ but we can’t take them all on. We get contacted every day,” says Kate.

Apart from a small office in Staffordshire, The Senior Staffy Club currently has no base.

“The dream is to have our own centre – one day.”

With a strong belief in spending quality time with the dogs, Kate ensures each staffy under the charity’s care gets properly looked after, well-fed, walked and that they have regular check-ups with the vet.

“They have had a varied past and need a loving home. We assess them fully and check to see if there are any issues,” says Kate.

“They come to us for lots of reasons – they may have been a stray, they might have been abused, sometimes the owner’s died and there’s no one left to look after them or perhaps the family has changed – maybe the owners have had a baby or don’t have time to look after them anymore.”

Kate says the most magical moment is seeing them go from being in a bad state to finding them a loving home.

“It’s about giving them a second chance.”

 

Find out more about the Senior Staffy Club and the fantastic work that they do here: www.seniorstaffyclub.co.uk/about-us

 

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